The Selection Accumulator; a Jukebox's Brain technology connections

by charoenmotorcycles123DG



You thought the last video was complicated? Ha!
Today, we take a look at the selection accumulator; how it works, what it does, and how that relates to the rest of the machine. Strap in, folks!

Here is that previous video;

And some other links!
Technology Connextras (the second channel that stuff goes on sometimes):

Technology Connections on Twitter:

The TC Subreddit

You can support this channel on Patreon! Thanks to contributions from viewers like you, Technology Connections can continue being as weird and unpredictable as it is. If you’d like to join the cool people who bring these totally rad videos to you (I’m hip and with it!), you can find out how at the link below. Thank you for your consideration!

And thank you to the following patrons!
Chad Fertig, M Shrimptoast, Joseph Houghtaling, Ben Tucci, Dave Stares, Josh Braun, Joe Johnson, Daniel Dugger, Christopher Lowell, Oleg, Michael Sacchi, Ali Elam, Dan Allen, Trent Crawford, Zhenbang Xiao, Jason Watson, Maxime Aubaret, Markus Towara, Barky doggo, Ectra, Dylan Taylor, Reid Fishler, Daniel Meagher, Joel, Z, Clemens, Bill Bates, Centronias, Dennis Walsh, Alex Warren, marc lulkin, Paul Robins, CanyonMID, Les, Keenan Finucan, Ian Clanton-Thuon, Ryan Pratt, Paul Newton, Greg Golds, Theo Keeler, Tyler Alberico, Benjamin Ratner, Doug Davenport, Paul Sharp, Craig Brickey, Zidy, Justin Trout, Brandon, John Galus, Karl Kornel, Danila Fediashchin, Adam, Zach Rose, Arvin Prasetya Wiranata, Patryk Majewski, Ryan Kamphuis, WB, AmbientCyan, Sam Calandra, Wolfgang Gschwendtner, Józef Sokołowski, Will Preston, Dave Treadwell, Stuart Stanfield, Christopher Olson, Kor Nielsen, Adrian Hunziker, Jacob Ford, Stephen Amar, Bryce, Andy Holzhammer, Ethan Mears, Jon Clegg, David Jeroslow, Ian Hills, Charles MacDonald, Andrew, Tim Jones, Crisco762, Phil E, AnsulFolf, Roy Burns, Raymond Coutts, Ian Spence, John De Witt, Mike A, Alex Dodge, hipp1eguy, Justin Derleth, El Jefe, NEON725, Emily Eisenberg, Mark Christian, Dylan Leblanc, Bard, Megan Lovett, LGR, Jeffrey Frasure, kn0tsin, Michael Gooden, David Wulff, Max, Fredrik Lindroth, Michael Riegel, Paul Kavanagh, finacious, Isaac Clarke, Sean Hearrell, Christopher Macdonald, Selectric, Keithius, Sönke Schlüter, Julian Haldenby, Seb Bacanu, Mauricio, Hunter Thor, Austin C Borger, Gabe Cook, Anapan, S0N0S, Michael Patron, Sonic Ether, mike quick, Adam, Lucas, microserf, Daniel Kraut, André Gil da Costa, Paul Han, jacob topkok, Luka Sanzin, Peter Hillier, PeterH, William Holt, Grant Campau, Else, Michael Dunn, Rin, Richard Hicks, Matthew Foulks, Levi Maaia, Mike Roach, Simon Janssen, Jorge Caballero, Kyle Messner, Mainstream, Matthew Schwartz, gs, ashka, Mr. Yan, Matthias Feist, RedR0ze, adan c, Thomas Fuchs, Alan Holland, Dan Boulden, Simon Hookham, Phiroze Dalal, Devin Rosenthal, Avalon Hamakei, Ray Hardman, G Cowell, Dan Coulson, Mike Berman, Kevin Hamilton, Jack Manning, Chase Tarson, Christopher D’Arpa, Marshall Kurtz, Matt Goldman, Hurf Durr, shaun morris, David Bell, Miguel Gonzalez, Ed Giardina, Bryce Ontiveros, Kenneth A Cusson, Johnathan Reale, Charles Corbin, Simon Arrow, Brett Walton, Martin Schröder, lakewalk3r, Hayden McAfee, Dan Maku, Mark Injerd, Paul Demers, Stephen P Wilshaw, Vladi Ivanov, Michael Sandler, Jacob Harrington, Gustav Toth, Pete Iacono, Perl the Raven, Clay, Jason Letchworth, Benjamin Deming, Thorbjörn Meyer, Eben, M1GEO, Alan Shieh, Christopher Whyte, Michael Kaegler, Chrno, Taylor Smith, Colin Macdonald, Shlomi Borovitz, Krispin Miller, Jan Borcherding, Matthew Castellana, Finn, Sean Anderson, David, Duncan Mulholland, Chaz Serir, Jason Downs, Lincoln Cole, Deviant Ollam, Dillan Weems, Eldrin_22, Mitch SuperKnot, Andrew Bogard, Cameron McCormick, Craig Guy, Brandon Ryan, Keith Hemenway, Travis Geiselbrecht, Pedro Brito, Ryan Milke, AARGH!, Marko, splateagle, MaikSan, Timothy Miller, Jim Renney, Steve Lafferty, Joseph Mayfield, Noah Dobson, William Astle, Joe King, John Plasket, Nathaniel Cole Alexander, Don Eitner, Adam Belebczuk, Matt, Karol Koziol, Matt Lawrence, Matthew Krajnak, James Fuhrman

Images related to the topic technology connections

The Selection Accumulator; a Jukebox's Brain

The Selection Accumulator; a Jukebox's Brain

Search related to the topic The Selection Accumulator; a Jukebox's Brain

#Selection #Accumulator #Jukebox39s #Brain
The Selection Accumulator; a Jukebox's Brain
technology connections
See all the latest ways to make money online: See more here
See all the latest ways to make money online: See more here

See also  STUDENTS FROM B. TECH. FOOD TECHNOLOGY MUST WATCH, ONLY 3 TRICKS TO GET GOOD MARKS IN THEORY EXAMS. b tech food technology

You may also like

25 comments

Technology Connections 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

Astute viewers will notice that it's been much longer than a week since the last video.
In light of everything going on in the real world right now, I hope this can serve as a meaningful distraction. I, as I'm sure is the case for many of you as well, am unsettled by a lot and it's hard to work, or even just think. I have never felt that I've been an anxious person, and now I'm learning what real anxiety is.
This pinned comment surely doesn't mean much, but to everyone watching; please be safe. Make as many technology connections with loved ones as you can, and keep your chin up.

Reply
Mad Elf x 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

Why is it Side 1/2 instead of Side A/B? Because the side of the record that is played when you select Side 1 could be either Side A or Side B, depending on how the record was placed in the carousel. If the machine called it Side A, the person stacking the carousel would need to put the record that way round; by calling it Side 1 they decoupled the behaviour of the mechanism from the labelling of the record. (It also allows double-A-sides to be included without the machine getting confused.)

Reply
Jxdizzle6969 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

I've seen some of your videos through YouTube's suggestions over several months occasionally and after a few videos I decided to subscribe. Well after powering through many of your videos over several days (all of which i enjoyed) I found this two video series to be my favorite by far. From the actual item in question to the flow and descriptions these just stood out to me and became my favorites. Keep doing what your doing!

Reply
Cyrille Bournival 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

Let's define a computer as something that contains an ALU.

Reply
Nick Tunder 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

So if i understand right, this jukebox doesn't play the records in order they are selected but in order they are on the carousel? I remember other models also played records in the order they are selected.

Reply
garbo 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

Never gave it a thought about how the old juke boxes stored songs. Can remember going to a large diner that had little juke boxes at each table. Appeared to take a long time to listen to the songs that you selected on a busy night. Heard on one of the TV shows that buy & sell older items that juke boxes have lost value last 10 years. When my dad purchased our old house back in 1955 owner left a jukebox that played 78 records. I spent hours taking it apart trying to figure out how it was built. I was only about 8 years old.

Reply
Neptune X12 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

I love old technology. really makes you wonder how the hell they even built it

Reply
David Bumpus 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

Older video of yours but I enjoyed it and I really liked the story behind it at the end of the video.

Reply
Kurt E. Clothier 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

not a series of "buttons," but certainly a series of "switches."

Reply
Declawed Boys 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

Your jukebox videos are ones I frequently watch to relax, I find these two so calming

Reply
Zoë MacGregor 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

This thing is so cool and I'm very envious of you

Reply
Ben Faucher 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

If you’re interested in actual general-purpose electromechanical computing, look up Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine.

Reply
PAtrick Del 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

I'm so glad to find this. I've been looking for an answer about how jukeboxes from when I was a kid (late 60s) worked without any logic. Brilliant!

Reply
Vlady Yakovenko 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

I love the font in the box

Reply
Robert Fabiano 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

I like that you acknowledge the fact that not every YouTube users (Premium) see cards.

Reply
Mark Lyon 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

Couldn’t you double-select a record by choosing the two letters directly across from each other?

Reply
stephen flint 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

Brilliant video!! I wish you were my neighbor. I'd enjoy talking with you. Lol

Reply
Alban Vieille 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

In my opinion, this machine using 1 and 2 as side labels instead of A and B makes sense, since they refer to different objects. You can place in the record arbitrarily both ways. If for some reason you prefer the track that’s on B side, just revert the record and it’ll play with position 1.

Reply
Max Headrom 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

It is a computer. Computers should compute but what is to compute? To reach a result one must get variables and deal with 'data structure'. Can a computer that just compare things calculate? Yes, it can – all you have to do is write all calculations on a table (just as Richard Feynman explains on a video somewhere). I must note, however, that we use the word "computer" in the sense of "general purpose automated computer machine". In the past, a computer was someone who did calculations (like those under Feynman during the Manhattan Project). In the past, women did this, mostly, and the word computer, in Spanish is feminine. BTW, that's why a woman was responsible for keeping the Mark I running and found the first computer bug. The Mark I, btw, was not a general purpose computer.

Reply
Andreas Hutterer 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

This is probably the most complicated video I've ever watched on YT 🙂

Reply
David Struve 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

One way you could look at this is that this entire unit IS a giant computer chip. Modern computers are still essentially nothing more than a whole BUNCH of microscopic relays – and the order of operations is done not by physical movement of switches, arms and solenoids but by variations in voltage, resistance and signal wave types – and the selection process from button to rotating selector arm replaced with lines of code instead.

Reply
David Struve 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

These things are so utterly, beautifully complex yet simple at the same time, it's almost magical. Electro-mechanical perfection!! 😀

Reply
North Paw 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

I have the Wurlitzer 3300 and I need a little help understanding how to fix it, due to a moving situation I currently do not have it with me but I would like to know if I can get it contact with you so that when I do get it back in my possession I can properly fix it, thanks

Reply
Zach Brenner 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

It might be a computer, but it's certainly not turning compliant

Reply
Donald Smith 27/09/2021 - 2:48 PM

The 3100 was the new one when I worked on them. I saw some difference between the one I worked on and this one. The biggest problem we had was that most of the Jukebox were in bars, drunks think everyone and everything drink. And when they put there drinks in the coin slot things stop working the way they should. Also drinks in the buttons gets sticky and they don't work. Remember the way the buttons work with the relays, what happens when all the drinks get in the buttons and the springs can't push them back out, because the drunks thought that the Jukebox needed a drink. They get very sticky and don't pop back out. So you can say that if you give your Jukebox drinks they get drunk and do stupid things. Then I had to go out and get them to work again. No Coffee didn't help! LOL!

Reply

Leave a Comment